Souvenir de la Tarantella Napolitaine dirigée par Louis Puccinelli Maître de Dans dessinée par Gaétan Dura. Lith Gatti & Dura. DANCE - 19th century - Italian, Louis Puccinelli.
Souvenir de la Tarantella Napolitaine dirigée par Louis Puccinelli Maître de Dans dessinée par Gaétan Dura. Lith Gatti & Dura

Souvenir de la Tarantella Napolitaine dirigée par Louis Puccinelli Maître de Dans dessinée par Gaétan Dura. Lith Gatti & Dura

Naples: Gatti & Dura, [ca. 1834]. Oblong octavo panorama, consisting of lithographic title + 18 hand-coloured lithographic plates signed in the stone by the artist + 1 plate of lithographic music for the tarantella in piano score.

Each plate with an animated illustration of a dancing couple with descriptive text regarding the execution of the particular step below the image.

Individual plates measure approximately 140 x 182 mms. and are joined in accordion format; the whole when extended measures 140 x 354 mms. In a contemporary half mid-tan leather patterned board folder with gilt-rolled spine.

Binding slightly worn. Slight foxing; minor soiling to edges; two plates with tape repair to inner blank margins; final leaf laid down.

Quite rare. Not in Leslie, Beaumont or Magriel. Derra de Moroda 2105. OCLC (3 copies only).

The drawings by Dura (1805-1878) and the colouring are particularly well-executed.

The tarantella has roots in ancient history; it is said to derive its name from the city of Tarentum (modern-day Taranto), formerly a Greek settlement on the southern coast of Italy. Historians have identified representations of the dance in ancient Greek vase paintings and on the wall paintings at Pompeii..."

"... According to a widespread legend, the dance acquired its name because it was used as a cure for the poisonous bite of the tarantula spider. Gurzau reports that this etymological point was debated at the Venice Congress and Folk Festival in 1949, and the participants concluded that the legend was based on the similarity of the two words rather than the actuality. In apparent contradiction to this conclusion is the fact that the tarantella is performed as a kind of exorcism by the practitioners of Tarantism, an Italian possession cult comparable to the zar cult of Ethiopia or Vodun in Haiti..."

"Stylized tarantellas have been used to add a touch of local color to the ballet stage. An early example is the tarantella created for Fanny Elssler in Jean Corallli's ballet La Tarentule (1836), the plot of which centers around real and feigned bites of the tarantula." The International Encyclopedia of Dance, Vol. 6, p. 104.

An important document for the reconstruction of the Neapolitan tarantella. Item #22347

Price: $6,500.00  other currencies

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