Autograph letter signed to Giuseppe Verdi in the hand of his leading soprano. VERDI, Erminia Frezzolini.

Autograph letter signed to Giuseppe Verdi in the hand of his leading soprano

4 pp. Large octavo (ca. 220 x 170 mm.). Dated Eaux-Bonnes (Pyrénées Atlantiques, France), September 25, 1855. In Italian (with translation).

A lengthy and very interesting letter discussing Frezzolini's proposed engagement at the Paris Opéra as Eleonora (in Il Trovatore) and its terms, alluding to an opera that she does not want to sing, etc.

"All other considerations aside, how can one live in Paris on such a pittance? I also believe it necessary that, entering such an enticing theatre as the Opéra, one must do it without pomp and ceremony but discreetly, as is appropriate for an artist who, unfortunately, is not at the beginning of her career. In any case, I know that such are your ideas, and that is the reason why I had begged you, and still beg you, to settle this affair yourself... I would be happy... to combine business with pleasure and appear again in Paris with my part of Eleonora, and I am convinced that, if you really want it, it will per force be done..."

Slightly worn and browned with some show-through; soiled at upper outer corners; creased at folds.

Frezzolini was the leading Verdi soprano in the 1840s.

Closely identified with Romantic opera and especially with Verdi, Frezzolini "had bel canto skills but sang in the new manner called for by Verdi's works, uniting smooth legato and dramatic power. Her sensational début, at Florence in 1837, was in the title role of Bellini's Beatrice di Tenda; this remained one of her most effective parts, along with Donizetti's Lucrezia Borgia (in which she caused another sensation, at La Scala in 1840), Bellini's Elvira (I puritani), and Verdi's Giselda, Gilda (Rigoletto) and Leonora (Il trovatore). She also created the title role in Coccia’s Giovanna II, regina di Napoli (1840, Milan). She was compared to Maria Malibran for boldness, intensity and pathos, with an added sweetness of timbre; Fétis wrote of her beauty and nobility on stage. After an early London season (1841) and many Italian engagements, she spent the years between 1847 and 1857 in St Petersburg, Madrid, London and Paris." John Rosselli in Grove Music Online. Item #23353

Price: $1,500.00  other currencies

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