Hulda. Marche et airs de Ballet. Transcription a 2 pianos. Autograph musical manuscript signed and dated November 18, 1889. Cesar FRANCK.
Hulda. Marche et airs de Ballet. Transcription a 2 pianos. Autograph musical manuscript signed and dated November 18, 1889

Hulda. Marche et airs de Ballet. Transcription a 2 pianos. Autograph musical manuscript signed and dated November 18, 1889

Folio (345 x 270 mm.). 35, [ii] (blank), 36-61 pp. Wrappers with attractive calligraphic titling to upper. Notated in black ink on 14 hand-ruled staves per page. Occasional autograph corrections; significant rewriting of two bars on page 42; additional markings in red crayon and pencil.

Wrappers slightly worn and torn at edges. Minor internal wear.

Franck began his opera Hulda in 1882 and finished it in 1885. Its first performance was given posthumously on March 8, 1894 at Monte Carlo. The opera is based on a Scandinavian legend with text by Ch. Grandmougin after a dramatization by Bjornson. It was not published until 1894, at which time it was issued by Choudens in Paris. Even though Hulda did not premiere until after Franck's death, the Marche and Airs de Ballet from the opera were performed earlier and quite well received.

In a letter to Vincent d'Indy (one of Franck's students) written from Antwerp on August 14, 1885 Franck wrote: "I want to tell you that at a concert here your `Chevanchee du Cid' was played perfectly, and had a great success...You were in the same company as your master, whose march and ballet music from `Hulda' were warmly applauded..." D'Indy: César Franck, p. 246.

The same music from Hulda was also performed at the Franck Festival on January 30th 1887 at the Cirque d'Hiver. It would appear, moreover, that of the entire opera the ballet music was closest to Franck's heart. Again, quoting from d'Indy: "At the same time he almost took the bit between his teeth (forgive the trite expression) at one moment while composing Hulda; but it is remarkable that it was the ballet that carried him away from the first, and that was still symphonic music. He wrote this ballet without pause or break, at the same time as a prologue, which does not appear in the score as it now stands, having been replaced, no one knows why, by an epilogue. One evening in the autumn of 1882, when Henri Duparc and I called to see him, he came to meet us, flushed and very much excited, and fired off these words at us, which can only be really appreciated by those who knew "Father" Franck: "I think the ballet of Hulda is a very good bit of work; I am very pleased with it. I have just been playing it over to myself, and - I even danced it!" ibid p. 179. Item #25019

Price: $24,500.00  other currencies

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