I due Foscari Melodramma lirico di Francesco Maria Piave... Riduzione per Canto con accompagnamento di Pianoforte di L. Truzzi... N. 16797 al 16815... Fr. 32 –. [Piano-vocal score]. Giuseppe VERDI.

I due Foscari Melodramma lirico di Francesco Maria Piave... Riduzione per Canto con accompagnamento di Pianoforte di L. Truzzi... N. 16797 al 16815... Fr. 32 –. [Piano-vocal score]

Milano: Giovanni Ricordi [PNs 16797-16815], [1845]. Oblong folio. Brown blindstamped cloth-backed marbled boards with original pictorial upper wrapper laid down to upper. 1f. (title within decorative yellow border), [3] (table of contents with plate numbers), [4] (named cast list for the first performance), 5-187, [i] (blank) pp. Engraved. Each number with its own plate number, price, and secondary pagination.

Early manuscript titling in black ink to spine and upper board. Handstamp of the NYSO Bibliothek to lower margin of title.

Binding somewhat worn, rubbed, and bumped; upper joint partially split. Title quite foxed, yellow borders faded; blank upper margins slightly trimmed, not affecting text; minor foxing throughout, heavier to endpapers and outer leaves; corners of some leaves slightly creased. An attractive copy overall, with wide outer margins.

First complete edition, first issue of the second version. Hopkinson 42 B (a). Chusid p. 69. As the first version of the opera went to press in Milan, Paris, and London, Verdi made significant alterations during rehearsals for its first performance. Although separate pieces from the first version were published in London and Paris, Ricordi abandoned the engraving, and a complete score of the first version was never published or, indeed, performed.

I Due Foscari, in three acts to a libretto by Piave after Byron’s play The Two Foscari, was first performed in Rome at the Teatro Argentina on November 3, 1844.

"Composing I due Foscari occupied Verdi for about four months (a long time by the standards of most of its predecessors)... the opera... offers several interesting experiments. Perhaps most striking is the use of recurring themes to identify the principals. These proto-‘leitmotifs’ are here perhaps applied too rigidly, serving ultimately to deny any sense of development or progression in the characters; but the experiment itself is significant, suggesting that Verdi was anxious to explore new means of musical and dramatic articulation. The increased importance of local colour is also notable in light of Verdi’s future development. Although in I due Foscari the sense of a precise ambience seems imposed on the score rather than emerging from it, Verdi’s awareness of the potential of this added dimension in musical drama was decisive; from this time onwards he would rarely employ local colour in quite the mechanical way he had in his earliest operas." Roger Parker in Grove Music Online. Item #26726

Price: $2,800.00  other currencies

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