Autograph letter signed "Meyerbeer" to the theatrical agent Toffoli, "à l'agente théatrale de Mr. Verger" in Paris. Giacomo MEYERBEER.
Autograph letter signed "Meyerbeer" to the theatrical agent Toffoli, "à l'agente théatrale de Mr. Verger" in Paris.
Autograph letter signed "Meyerbeer" to the theatrical agent Toffoli, "à l'agente théatrale de Mr. Verger" in Paris.

Autograph letter signed "Meyerbeer" to the theatrical agent Toffoli, "à l'agente théatrale de Mr. Verger" in Paris.

[?1859]. 1 page of a bifolium. Small quarto. No place, no date. On Meyerbeer's personal letterhead with embossed decorative monogram at upper left corner. In French (with translation). With an original three-quarter length photographic portrait ca. 3.125" x 2.125" of the composer, seated, laid down together with a partial address panel. With decorative hand-coloured cornerpieces to right edge. Double-matted in ivory and silver, framed, and glazed. Overall size ca. 11.5" x 12.75".

Meyerbeer responds to Toffoli's request to two seats for that evening's performance of the composer's Pardon de Ploërmel.

From the collection of Marilyn Horne (b. 1934).

Meyerbeer was "the most frequently performed opera composer during the 19th century, linking Mozart and Wagner." Matthias Brzoska in Grove Music Online.

Le pardon de Ploërmel, an opéra comique in three acts to a libretto by Michel Carré and Jules Barbier after Carré’s play Les chercheurs de trésor, was first performed in Paris at the Opéra-Comique (Salle Favart) on April 4, 1859. It was originally in one act, enlarged to three at Meyerbeer’s request. "The composer converted the original spoken dialogue into recitatives for performances in other countries, where the opera often became known as Dinorah." Steven Huebner in Grove Music Online.

Giovanni Battista Verger (also known as Vergé or Werger, 1796-1840), was an operatic tenor. "After studying in Rome, he made his début at the Royal Theatre, Malta, prompting a critic to predict accurately Verger's place among the primi tenori of Italy... His agility and nuanced expression was within an almost baritone tessitura, similar to that of García. His repertory included works by Paer, Meyerbeer, Bellini and especially Rossini, who particularly admired his talents. A tenore serio, he excelled in Maometto II, La donna del lago, Tancredi, Semiramide and Otello. However, his significance lies in his impact on the transformation of the tenor voice, reflected in parts written for him by Donizetti, Mercadante and others. His last known appearance was in 1839." Riccardo La Spina in Grove Music Online. See also Becker: Meyerbeer Briefwechsel und Tagebücher III, pp. 492, 568, 691.

We have been unable to locate any further information on Toffoli.

A distinguished American mezzo-soprano, "Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top... In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde’s Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online. Item #30342

Price: $575.00  other currencies

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