Zhanna d'Ark [Joan of Arc]. Musical manuscript reduction for piano solo. A ballet, with choreography by Vladimir Burmeister. Russia, ca. 1955-1960. Nikolay PEYKO.

Zhanna d'Ark [Joan of Arc]. Musical manuscript reduction for piano solo. A ballet, with choreography by Vladimir Burmeister. Russia, ca. 1955-1960.

Folio. Sewn. 244 pp. Notated in ink on 14-stave Russian music manuscript paper. In an unidentified hand.

Contains 37 numbered pieces. With occasional corrections; page 79 with music extended into margin.

From the estate of Yuri Krasnapolsky (1934-2018), a protégé of Leonard Bernstein and assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic.

Spine slightly ragged. Slightly worn and browned; lower inner corners of first ca. 50 leaves stained.

The piano reduction score, made by the composer, was first published in Moscow in 1962. The present manuscript was most likely executed prior to publication and exhibits occasional differences from the published edition.

A ballet in 3 acts and 7 scenes, Peyko composed the music for Joan of Arc in 1953-55. The work was first performed at the Stanislavsky-Nemirovich-Danchenko Theatre in Moscow on December 29, 1957, with sets by B. Plentnyov and choreography by the important choreographer Vladimir Burmeister. A revised verion was staged at the same theatre in 1980-81.

"In Jeanne d'Arc... Burmeister continued his search for a convincing presentation of the heroic theme, choosing an epoch of cruel wars and upheavals. Joan of Arc's dances are strict and noble, their form and line restrained and pure, contrasting sharply with stiff and sensuous court dances. The heavy tread of the British soldiers in armor is set against the free, joyful, and sparkling dances of the French peasants. There were no conventional patterns in the ballet; everything was made as realistic as possible to convey an authentic period atmosphere as well as the character of the nations involved." International Encyclopedia of Dance, Vol. 2, p. 16.

Considered by some to be the composer's most notable work, Peyko's Joan of Arc continues the line of folkloristic, heroic ballets whose foundation was laid by Boris Asaf'yev's Plamya tsvetok (The Red Flower). Peyko focuses his attention on the crown scenes, which are written in the tradition of Russian music theatre." classic-music.ru/peyko.html

We would like to thank Dr. Albrecht Gaub, Dr. Alexander Komarov of the Russian National Museum of Music, and Christina Linklater of Harvard University for their kind assistance in the identification of the present manuscript. Item #30985

Price: $400.00  other currencies

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