L'Esule di Roma Melodramma Eroico di Domenico Gilardoni ... con nuovi pezzi espressamente composti dallo stesso Maestro in occasione che lo riproduceva sulle Scene del Teatro di Bergamo nella Fiera del 1840 Per Canto L. 30 It. ... [Piano-vocal score]. Gaetano DONIZETTI.

L'Esule di Roma Melodramma Eroico di Domenico Gilardoni ... con nuovi pezzi espressamente composti dallo stesso Maestro in occasione che lo riproduceva sulle Scene del Teatro di Bergamo nella Fiera del 1840 Per Canto L. 30 It. ... [Piano-vocal score]

Milano: F. Lucca [PNs 2108-2122], [1840?]. Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with dark brown cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black, original light brown publisher's printed wrappers bound in. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 1f. (recto named cast list, verso table of contents), 185 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved.

Original wrapper upper with series title "Opere Teatrali Complete Per Canto e per Piano-forte" in elaborate decorative frame engraved by Giuseppe Buccinelli, with portraits of Donizetti, Rossini, Bellini, Coppola, Mercadante, and Coccia. Named cast list from the 1839 performance in Codogno includes Cesare Badiali, Laura Assandri, and Ignazio Pasini.

From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981).

Binding slightly worn and with minor defects. Minimal foxing throughout, primarily confined to margins.

First edition of the Bergamo version. Inzaghi IN. 26, pp. 145-6. Bergamo catalog, p. 123.

L'Esule di Roma was composed to a libretto by Domenico Gilardoni after Luigi Marchionni’s Il proscritto romano (1820). It was premiered at the Teatro San Carlo in Naples on January 1, 1828.

"Donizetti’s score for L’esule is best known for the trio (‘Ei stesso! La mia vittima!’) that forms the finale to Act 1, notable for the naturalness of the diction and the eloquent interplay of the vocal parts. Donizetti’s first generally successful opera seria, it comes nine operas before Anna Bolena in the composer’s canon. It enjoyed a real vogue in the 1830s until it was supplanted by more overtly romantic works, such as Lucrezia Borgia and Lucia di Lammermoor. Donizetti thought well of this score, revising the part of Settimio for Rubini, for a revival at the S Carlo in December 1828. In July of that year, it had enjoyed a modest success at La Scala, with ten performances, in which Lablache and Winter (who had both sung in the première) were joined by Méric-Lalande as Argelia (originally sung by Adelaide Tosi). Donizetti was involved in further revising the opera when it was given in his honour at Bergamo in the summer of 1840, now with Eugenia Tadolini, the tenor Donzelli and Ignazio Marini as Murena. Recent performances and recordings have shown the work to contain much pleasing music, suggesting that it has been unfairly neglected." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online.

The named cast list from the Codogno performance perhaps suggests a preliminary performance before the revival in Bergamo, and the new aria ("S'io finor, bell'idol mio") was first sung by Ignazio Pasini. (See this edition, p. 141, Bergamo catalog, p. 123; cf. Ashbrook, Donizetti and His Operas, p. 152).

Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén. Item #31244

Price: $500.00  other currencies

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