Souvenir program for a performance of Sophocles's King Oedipus based on the version by William Yeats with new music by Harry Partch. Oakland, California, Mills College, March 14-16, 1952. Harry PARTCH.
Souvenir program for a performance of Sophocles's King Oedipus based on the version by William Yeats with new music by Harry Partch. Oakland, California, Mills College, March 14-16, 1952.

Souvenir program for a performance of Sophocles's King Oedipus based on the version by William Yeats with new music by Harry Partch. Oakland, California, Mills College, March 14-16, 1952.

Quarto. Decorative gray wrappers by Georgea Farmer printed in dark red, dark gold, and black. 8 pp.

Includes notes on Partch and stage director/designer Arch Lauterer, notes on the music, the drama, the performers, and the highly unconventional instruments designed by Partch himself. "The scale basis of the instruments is a 43-tone-to-the-octave system of acoustic, not equal intonation..."

Slightly worn.

With a leaf from the March 24, 1952 issue of Time Magazine featuring a short article on Partch tipped-in.

Partch was an American composer, theorist, instrument maker and performer. "He dedicated most of his life to implementing an alternative to equal temperament, which he found incapable of the true consonance his ear and essentially tonal aesthetic demanded. He invented an approach to just intonation he called ‘monophony’; realizing that traditional instruments and performers would be inimical to his system, he designed and constructed new and adapted instruments, developed notational systems, and trained performing groups wherever he was living and working. By the 1940s he had transformed a profound antipathy to the European concert tradition into the idea of ‘corporeality’, emphasizing a physical and communal quality in his music..."

"... interest in Partch has increased greatly since his death, and overtaken the view held of him in life as quixotic or worse. His eclecticism, especially his unfettered use of traditional music from around the world, anticipated many post-serialist trends, and he has served as a model for developments in intonation, acoustic instruments and timbre, even as computer programs produce the fine tunings of his ‘monophony’. He influenced the percussive motor-rhythm music of the minimalists of the 1960s and 70s, and his theatre works are precursors of numerous experiments since the mid-1950s. His life provides an example of curmudgeonly but humane courage." Richard Kassel in Grove Music Online. Item #31317

Price: $75.00  other currencies

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