Caterina Cornaro Tragedia lirica in un prologo e due atti di Giacomo Sacchéro ... Riduzione per Canto con accompagnamento di Pianoforte di P. Tonassi ... Fr. 36. [Piano-vocal score]. Gaetano DONIZETTI.
Caterina Cornaro Tragedia lirica in un prologo e due atti di Giacomo Sacchéro ... Riduzione per Canto con accompagnamento di Pianoforte di P. Tonassi ... Fr. 36. [Piano-vocal score].

Caterina Cornaro Tragedia lirica in un prologo e due atti di Giacomo Sacchéro ... Riduzione per Canto con accompagnamento di Pianoforte di P. Tonassi ... Fr. 36. [Piano-vocal score].

Milano: Giovanni Ricordi [PNs 17127-17145], [1855]. Oblong folio. Original publisher's dark yellow printed wrappers with title within elaborate pictorial border. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 1f. (recto table of contents, verso cast list), 5-198 pp. Engraved. Ricordi blindstamp to lower margin of upper wrapper and first leaves.

From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981).

Wrappers worn and soiled; edges chipped; partially disbound. Light foxing scattered throughout, heavier to title; margins browned, some with small tears, chips, and dampstains.

First Edition, later issue (blindstamp of Tito Ricordi to title, along with rear wrapper dated 1855). Inzaghi IN. 74, p. 194. Bergamo catalog, p. 121.

Caterina Cornaro, to a libretto by Giacomo Sacchèro after Vernoy de Saint-Georges libretto for Halévy’s La reine de Chypre (1841), was first performed in Naples at the Teatro San Carlo on January 18, 1844.

"Caterina Cornaro was partly composed in 1842, just before Don Pasquale, and completed during the following summer. It was the last of Donizetti’s operas to have its première during his lifetime; in the cast were Fanny Goldberg (Caterina), Gaetano Fraschani (Gerardo) and Filippo Coletti (Lusignano). This dark, vigorous score is notable for its use of surprisingly restless harmonies to create dramatic tension; yet it also contains passages of gratifying lyricism, notably in Lusignano’s Act 1 aria ‘Ah! non turbarti’ and Caterina’s ‘Non più affanni’ in Act 2." William Ashbrook in Grove Dictionary of Opera.

Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén. Item #31360

Price: $400.00  other currencies

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