Role portrait as Arturo in Bellini's I Puritani. Lithograph by R. J. Lane after A. E. Chalon. Proof. Giovanni Battista RUBINI.
Role portrait as Arturo in Bellini's I Puritani. Lithograph by R. J. Lane after A. E. Chalon. Proof.

Role portrait as Arturo in Bellini's I Puritani. Lithograph by R. J. Lane after A. E. Chalon. Proof.

London: J. Mitchell, 1836. Image size 285 x 200 mm, sheet size 480 x 343 mm, overall size 570 x 415 mm. Chine appliqué laid down to heavy card stock.

Rubini is depicted full length, standing, with head raised and arms outstretched. Facsimile signature "Gio: B: Rubini" in the stone beneath image and quotation from I Puritani, Act 1, Scene 5 printed to mount above imprint: "Arturo: __ e son beato, M'e celeste il giubilar!" With "Proof" printed at lower left.

From the collection of the distinguished American mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne (b. 1934).

Mounting sheet worn and browned, with small dark stain to center right and horizonal crease to backing, not affecting image.

A rare proof state of this well-known image. Hall III, p. 449, 7. Arrigoni & Bertarelli 3921 bis.

Italian tenor Giovanni Battista Rubini was a central figure in 19th-century opera; he worked particularly closely with Vincenzo Bellini, creating the roles of Gernando in Bianca e Gernando (1826), Gualtiero in Il pirata (1827), Elvino in La sonnambula (1831), and Arturo in I puritani (1835). He collaborated closely with Donizetti as well, premiering Percy in Anna Bolena (1830) and Fernando in Marino Faliero (1835).

"During Rubini’s career the tenor, traditionally the young hero of opera buffa, was assuming the same role in the serious genre. In the new Romantic opera of the 1830s Rubini had at his disposal an intensity of expression that far outshone the cool heroics of the castratos and their female successors. His phenomenally high range, which induced Bellini to include a high F for him in the third act of I puritani, must be understood in the context of the convention of his day, when no tenor was expected to sing any note higher than a′ with full chest resonance... He is also credited with introducing Romantic mannerisms such as the ‘sob’. He was neither good-looking nor a good actor; his strength lay in the beauty of his tone and the natural artistry of his phrasing." Julian Budden in Grove Music Online.

Alfred Edward Chalon (1780-1860) was a Swiss portrait artist and Richard James Lane (1800-1872) a noted English engraver and lithographer; they were both appointed as official artists to Queen Victoria in 1837.

"Horne had a voice of extraordinary range, rich and tangy in timbre, with a stentorian chest register and an exciting top... In concert she once achieved the feat of singing in a single programme Rossini arias and Brünnhilde’s Immolation Scene, proof of her exceptional versatility. Throughout her lengthy career she was an admired recitalist, singing lieder, mélodies, Spanish and American songs with equal aplomb." Alan Blyth in Grove Music Online. Item #31407

Price: $400.00  other currencies

See all items in Art & Photographs
See all items by