Original portrait engraving of the French lutenist and composer Jacques Gaultier holding a lute by the noted Dutch artist Jan Lievens (1607-1670). LUTE, Jacques late 16th century-ca. 1660 Gaultier.
Original portrait engraving of the French lutenist and composer Jacques Gaultier holding a lute by the noted Dutch artist Jan Lievens (1607-1670)

Original portrait engraving of the French lutenist and composer Jacques Gaultier holding a lute by the noted Dutch artist Jan Lievens (1607-1670)

[?]London: Jan Lievens, [ca. 1633].

Etching on 17th century laid paper. 265 x 212 mm plus ample margins. Indecipherable signature to verso. Archivally matted and framed. Overall size 440 x 360 mm. In very good condition.

Four lines of lettering in Latin to lower margin, "IACOBO GOUTERO INTER REGIOS MAGNAE BRITANNIAE ... CONSECRAVIT." and with "Ioannes Livius fecit et excudit" to lower right.

Gaultier is depicted seated at a window, holding a lute, with a peaceful scene of fields, trees, and sky in the distance.

Bartsch 59. Dutuit 58, iii/IV Hollstein 23, iii/V Kinsky: A History of Music in Pictures 136/2. Hall: Dramatic Portraits Vol. II, p.109. Hortschansky et al: Musiker der Renaissance und des Frühbarock ...Bildhefte des Westfälischen Landesmuseum für Kunst und Kulturgeschichte Nr. 26, Catalogue no. 96.

"[Gaultier] was sometimes known as ‘Gautier d’Angleterre’; he was probably not related to Denis and Ennemond Gaultier nor to Pierre Gautier (i) and certainly not to Pierre Gautier (ii). He left France in 1617 after being involved in a murder and fled to England, where he was attached to the court from 1625. He is mentioned in court records until about 1649, and his post was given to John Rogers at the Restoration in 1660. In 1627 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London and tortured for making scandalous remarks about King Charles I, his patron the Duke of Buckingham and Queen Henrietta Maria, whom he taught the lute. He seems to have been restored to favour by about 1629, when he sat for the portraitist Ian Lievens, probably at court. He went to the Netherlands in 1630 and later to Madrid, where he performed before the court; he may at that time have been Van Dyck’s model for a portrait now in the Prado. He took part in the masque The Triumph of Peace in 1634 and in Britannia triumphans in 1637. Contemporaries praised his brilliant, accurate and smooth playing; for example Constantijn Huygens, who corresponded with him, complimented his playing in 1622." Monique Rollin in Grove Music Online

"Lievens is among the most fascinating and enigmatic Dutch artists of the seventeenth century. ... During the late 1620s Lievens and his Leiden colleague Rembrandt van Rijn (Dutch, 1606-1669) had a close, symbiotic relationship that manifested both in the style and the subject matter of their works. ... By the early 1630s their manners became so similar that even contemporaries were unsure of the correct attributions of their paintings. ...

Lievens, who aspired to be an internationally renowned court artist, left Leiden for London to paint at the court of Charles I. There he came under the influence of Sir Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, 1599-1641), whom he had previously met in The Hague. Lievens remained in London until 1635, when he moved to Antwerp. No paintings and only a few drawings and prints are known from this period of his career. ...

Lievens' posthumous reputation has never risen to a level commensurate with that during his own lifetime or with the quality of his individual works. This phenomenon is partly explained by the peripatetic character of his career, by the widely ranging styles in which he worked, and by the fact that many of his best paintings have been wrongly attributed to other artists, including Rembrandt." Arthur K. Wheelock Jr. and Lara Yeager-Crasselt in National Gallery of Art Online Editions, April 24, 2014.

Item #38296

Price: $2,800.00  other currencies